Parents/legal guardians are educational partners with teachers. Homework is one of the ways that parents/legal guardians can support their child’s learning.

Homework provides parents/legal guardians with opportunities to:

  • Encourage and supervise learning as students practice skills at home;
  • Deepen their understanding of how their child is doing;
  • Model the family’s commitment to education; and
  • Provide appropriate assistance.

Since homework is designed to support learning and is not intended to provide instruction, parents/legal guardians are not required to take on the role of a professional teacher.

The amount of homework assigned to students should be differentiated according to age, developmental stage and grade level along a continuum from lower to upper elementary, elementary to junior high and junior high school to high school. At all levels, the time a student spends on homework may vary and individual student needs and capacity should always be considered.

Parents/legal guardians, who wish to significantly modify homework expectations for their children, are encouraged to meet with teachers and when appropriate, school administration, to discuss the details of a homework plan to meet the student’s needs.

Kindergarten – Grade 3
Suggested time frame: 5-10 minutes of homework per week.

Formal assigned homework at Kindergarten to Grade 3 levels is not recommended. Teachers may suggest and provide resources to support early learning activities such as reading, visits to community resources or interactive activities to develop skills. Completion of these learning opportunities is optional.

Grades 4 to 6
Suggested time frame: 30 minutes of homework per school night.

Various types of meaningful homework are introduced and may be assigned by teachers keeping in mind the balance of family time, the focus on supporting individual student success, the need to differentiate homework assignments, types and quantity and the academic needs/abilities of the student.

Grades 7 to 9
Suggested time frame: 60 minutes of homework per school night.

The completion and management of homework tasks supports junior high students to take increasing responsibility for their learning. Since junior high students have many teachers, it is important for the school and teachers to identify and implement strategies to coordinate homework across the subject areas in order to avoid overloading at any one time.

Grades 10 to 12
Suggested time frame: 120 minutes of homework per school night.

Since high school students are young adults, who may be required to undertake independent work as an employee or as a student at the post-secondary education level, they should take increasing responsibility for managing and completing homework assignments. Teachers will work with students to meet the students’ academic goals while at the same time designing homework to be meaningful and to reflect the students’ realities at home.

Do’s:

  • Teach your child from a young age the importance of time management and pacing themselves. If there is a project due in a week, they shouldn’t be starting it the night before. Good time management skills will not only help them avoid late nights but will also be beneficial to them later on in life.
  • Make yourself available to provide help in clarifying the homework assignment. It is okay to help your child make sure they understand what they need to do. By asking them, “what they need to do” or “what do you think it means?” helps the child to articulate their view of the assignment.
  • Encourage your child to also ask for guidance and clarification from the teacher if they do not understand the assignment.
  • Help your child set up a work-break schedule. For some kids, it is easier to do homework in 20 or 30 minute blocks and then have a short break. Having a schedule also provides a routine for your child to follow which will make it easier for them to tackle assignments once they are used to the work-break schedule. However, make sure your child follows the schedule and works until break time.
  • Encourage your child to be resourceful and make use of all available tools such as going to the library or using websites to help with research.
  • Provide praise and encouragement.


Don’ts:

  • Don’t correct your child’s work. Instead, you can check the work and let your child know how many errors there are, marking the area so they can find and correct them on their own.
  • Don’t try to encourage your child by telling them how easy the homework is. This will only discourage them and cause them frustration.
  • Don’t make homework the last thing in your child’s schedule. This will only give the message that homework isn’t important or should be done if there is time. Teach your child that homework is a priority.
  • Don’t do your child’s homework for them. Although this might seem like an obvious one, it still is a temptation for many parents. Children need to do their own homework in order to learn understand the material. Homework also teaches the child responsibility.

Homework assignments may be used by teachers to determine the next steps in teaching and learning. Homework, together with other forms of assessment, may also support the development of a better learner profile of a student’s understanding of curriculum outcomes. While it is possible for some of the homework to be evaluated and marked, it is not a requirement or expectation that any homework be counted towards an academic grade.

For more information, please see the district Administrative Procedure on homework:
AP 364

Homework

Parents/legal guardians are educational partners with teachers. Homework is one of the ways that parents/legal guardians can support their child’s learning.

Homework provides parents/legal guardians with opportunities to:

  • Encourage and supervise learning as students practice skills at home;
  • Deepen their understanding of how their child is doing;
  • Model the family’s commitment to education; and
  • Provide appropriate assistance.

Since homework is designed to support learning and is not intended to provide instruction, parents/legal guardians are not required to take on the role of a professional teacher.

The amount of homework assigned to students should be differentiated according to age, developmental stage and grade level along a continuum from lower to upper elementary, elementary to junior high and junior high school to high school. At all levels, the time a student spends on homework may vary and individual student needs and capacity should always be considered.

Parents/legal guardians, who wish to significantly modify homework expectations for their children, are encouraged to meet with teachers and when appropriate, school administration, to discuss the details of a homework plan to meet the student’s needs.

Kindergarten – Grade 3
Suggested time frame: 5-10 minutes of homework per week.

Formal assigned homework at Kindergarten to Grade 3 levels is not recommended. Teachers may suggest and provide resources to support early learning activities such as reading, visits to community resources or interactive activities to develop skills. Completion of these learning opportunities is optional.

Grades 4 to 6
Suggested time frame: 30 minutes of homework per school night.

Various types of meaningful homework are introduced and may be assigned by teachers keeping in mind the balance of family time, the focus on supporting individual student success, the need to differentiate homework assignments, types and quantity and the academic needs/abilities of the student.

Grades 7 to 9
Suggested time frame: 60 minutes of homework per school night.

The completion and management of homework tasks supports junior high students to take increasing responsibility for their learning. Since junior high students have many teachers, it is important for the school and teachers to identify and implement strategies to coordinate homework across the subject areas in order to avoid overloading at any one time.

Grades 10 to 12
Suggested time frame: 120 minutes of homework per school night.

Since high school students are young adults, who may be required to undertake independent work as an employee or as a student at the post-secondary education level, they should take increasing responsibility for managing and completing homework assignments. Teachers will work with students to meet the students’ academic goals while at the same time designing homework to be meaningful and to reflect the students’ realities at home.

Do’s:

  • Teach your child from a young age the importance of time management and pacing themselves. If there is a project due in a week, they shouldn’t be starting it the night before. Good time management skills will not only help them avoid late nights but will also be beneficial to them later on in life.
  • Make yourself available to provide help in clarifying the homework assignment. It is okay to help your child make sure they understand what they need to do. By asking them, “what they need to do” or “what do you think it means?” helps the child to articulate their view of the assignment.
  • Encourage your child to also ask for guidance and clarification from the teacher if they do not understand the assignment.
  • Help your child set up a work-break schedule. For some kids, it is easier to do homework in 20 or 30 minute blocks and then have a short break. Having a schedule also provides a routine for your child to follow which will make it easier for them to tackle assignments once they are used to the work-break schedule. However, make sure your child follows the schedule and works until break time.
  • Encourage your child to be resourceful and make use of all available tools such as going to the library or using websites to help with research.
  • Provide praise and encouragement.


Don’ts:

  • Don’t correct your child’s work. Instead, you can check the work and let your child know how many errors there are, marking the area so they can find and correct them on their own.
  • Don’t try to encourage your child by telling them how easy the homework is. This will only discourage them and cause them frustration.
  • Don’t make homework the last thing in your child’s schedule. This will only give the message that homework isn’t important or should be done if there is time. Teach your child that homework is a priority.
  • Don’t do your child’s homework for them. Although this might seem like an obvious one, it still is a temptation for many parents. Children need to do their own homework in order to learn understand the material. Homework also teaches the child responsibility.

Homework assignments may be used by teachers to determine the next steps in teaching and learning. Homework, together with other forms of assessment, may also support the development of a better learner profile of a student’s understanding of curriculum outcomes. While it is possible for some of the homework to be evaluated and marked, it is not a requirement or expectation that any homework be counted towards an academic grade.

For more information, please see the district Administrative Procedure on homework:
AP 364

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