Blessed Marie-Rose Durocher
Eulalie (Marie-Rose) Durocher was born into a deeply spiritual family of eleven children in St. Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec in October of 1811. Faith was instilled upon her at a young age, as she attained education from the schools run by the Congregation of Notre Dame in both Saint Denis and Montréal.

Drawn to a life of religious service, she was turned away due to poor health. After the death of her mother, she returned home to assist in the care of her father and remaining siblings, eventually becoming housekeeper to her brother, a priest, who brought her with him to Longueil, where she spent the next 12 years helping with pastoral ministry. Through her works, she became known for her courtesy, graciousness, and leaderships abilities, eventually being referred to as “the saint of Beloeil.”

Through her work, she realized that the young (especially females) had a great need for religious instruction, and planned to solve the problem through the founding of an educational order. In 1843, with the blessing of the Bishop of Montréal, she and her companions established the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary, with Eulalie (having taken the name “Marie-Rose”) as mother superior.

The demand for education was met through rapid expansion by the Order. A day school was also established, opening its doors for poor and abandoned children. The Order’s curriculum was taught in both English and French and included many of the finer arts, and useful skills such as home economics. As the Order spread beyond Québec, the doors were opened to males as well.

Marie-Rose used the Order to promote charity, and help members of her community to strengthen their relationship with God. Under her leadership, the Sisters developed a spirituality based on faithfulness and devotion to Mary and the Blessed Sacrament. They also devoted themselves to Ignatian prayer, after the teaching of Spanish theologian St. Ignatius of Loyola.

She died in 1849, yet her work still carries on to this day. Inspired by her faith and devotion, she was beatified by John Paul II in 1982, and is remembered as an educator of poor children. She is also the patron for protection against frail health, illness, and loss of parents. The Sisters are still operational on an international level.

Patron

Blessed Marie-Rose Durocher
Eulalie (Marie-Rose) Durocher was born into a deeply spiritual family of eleven children in St. Antoine-sur-Richelieu, Québec in October of 1811. Faith was instilled upon her at a young age, as she attained education from the schools run by the Congregation of Notre Dame in both Saint Denis and Montréal.

Drawn to a life of religious service, she was turned away due to poor health. After the death of her mother, she returned home to assist in the care of her father and remaining siblings, eventually becoming housekeeper to her brother, a priest, who brought her with him to Longueil, where she spent the next 12 years helping with pastoral ministry. Through her works, she became known for her courtesy, graciousness, and leaderships abilities, eventually being referred to as “the saint of Beloeil.”

Through her work, she realized that the young (especially females) had a great need for religious instruction, and planned to solve the problem through the founding of an educational order. In 1843, with the blessing of the Bishop of Montréal, she and her companions established the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary, with Eulalie (having taken the name “Marie-Rose”) as mother superior.

The demand for education was met through rapid expansion by the Order. A day school was also established, opening its doors for poor and abandoned children. The Order’s curriculum was taught in both English and French and included many of the finer arts, and useful skills such as home economics. As the Order spread beyond Québec, the doors were opened to males as well.

Marie-Rose used the Order to promote charity, and help members of her community to strengthen their relationship with God. Under her leadership, the Sisters developed a spirituality based on faithfulness and devotion to Mary and the Blessed Sacrament. They also devoted themselves to Ignatian prayer, after the teaching of Spanish theologian St. Ignatius of Loyola.

She died in 1849, yet her work still carries on to this day. Inspired by her faith and devotion, she was beatified by John Paul II in 1982, and is remembered as an educator of poor children. She is also the patron for protection against frail health, illness, and loss of parents. The Sisters are still operational on an international level.