About Math

Students construct their understanding of mathematics by developing meaning based on a variety of learning experiences. The use of manipulatives, visuals and a variety of pedagogical approaches can address the diversity of learning styles and developmental stages of students. The main goals of mathematics education are to prepare students to:

  • solve problems
  • communicate and reason mathematically
  • make connections between mathematics and its applications
  • become mathematically literate
  • appreciate and value mathematics
  • make informed decisions as contributors to society

Mathematics is one way of understanding, interpreting and describing our world.

Mathematics Course and Level requirements for Post-Secondary Institutions in Alberta

Many parents and students are asking which mathematics courses should be taken in high school as they begin to explore their passions and career pathways. The following web pages offer detailed information about course selection and describe various options students can choose in high school.

Parents and students are also encouraged to:

  • ask your school’s guidance or career counsellor for their advice.
  • talk to people who are working in a student’s field of interest or who have similar goals.
  • refer to the Alberta Learning Information Service (ALIS)* website for the most recent information regarding mathematics requirements at post-secondary institutions and programs in Alberta.

*In some cases, not all post-secondary programs and institutions are listed. This site will be updated on a regular basis as new information is made available. It is always recommended that you check directly with post-secondary institutions about entrance requirements to ensure accuracy and completeness of information.

Click here for more information on Alberta Education Mathematics for Parents.

Math 10 Common (10C)

All students who passed Math 9 with a 50% +, enroll in this math program. This program is the starting point after which a student will choose either the -1 or the -2 sequences. The units of study require students to develop a conceptual knowledge base and skill set in preparation for the desired course sequence. Regardless of the chosen sequence, the students will build upon previous knowledge and progress to a larger knowledge base working with simple to more complex problems.

Math 10-3

Those students who did not successfully complete Math 9 (49% or less), will take this course as the starting point. The course is designed to provide students with a mathematical foundation and critical thinking skills for entry into the majority of the trades and/or directly into the workforce. Students will acquire many practical mathematical life skills.

Math 10-1 / 20-1 / 30-1 Course Sequence

This course sequence is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical thinking skills identified for entry into post secondary programs that require the study of calculus. Topics include algebra and number; measurement; relations and functions; trigonometry; and permutations, combinations and binomial theorem.

Math 10-2 / 20-2 / 30-2 Course Sequence

This course sequence is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical thinking skills identified for post-secondary studies in programs that do not require the study of calculus. Topics include geometry, measurement, number and logic, logical reasoning, relations and functions,statistics, and probability.

Math 10-3 / 20-3 / 30-3 Course Sequence

This course sequence is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical thinking skills identified for entry into the majority of trades and for direct entry into the work force. Topics include algebra, geometry, measurement, number, statistics and probability.

Math

About Math

Students construct their understanding of mathematics by developing meaning based on a variety of learning experiences. The use of manipulatives, visuals and a variety of pedagogical approaches can address the diversity of learning styles and developmental stages of students. The main goals of mathematics education are to prepare students to:

  • solve problems
  • communicate and reason mathematically
  • make connections between mathematics and its applications
  • become mathematically literate
  • appreciate and value mathematics
  • make informed decisions as contributors to society

Mathematics is one way of understanding, interpreting and describing our world.

Mathematics Course and Level requirements for Post-Secondary Institutions in Alberta

Many parents and students are asking which mathematics courses should be taken in high school as they begin to explore their passions and career pathways. The following web pages offer detailed information about course selection and describe various options students can choose in high school.

Parents and students are also encouraged to:

  • ask your school’s guidance or career counsellor for their advice.
  • talk to people who are working in a student’s field of interest or who have similar goals.
  • refer to the Alberta Learning Information Service (ALIS)* website for the most recent information regarding mathematics requirements at post-secondary institutions and programs in Alberta.

*In some cases, not all post-secondary programs and institutions are listed. This site will be updated on a regular basis as new information is made available. It is always recommended that you check directly with post-secondary institutions about entrance requirements to ensure accuracy and completeness of information.

Click here for more information on Alberta Education Mathematics for Parents.

Math 10 Common (10C)

All students who passed Math 9 with a 50% +, enroll in this math program. This program is the starting point after which a student will choose either the -1 or the -2 sequences. The units of study require students to develop a conceptual knowledge base and skill set in preparation for the desired course sequence. Regardless of the chosen sequence, the students will build upon previous knowledge and progress to a larger knowledge base working with simple to more complex problems.

Math 10-3

Those students who did not successfully complete Math 9 (49% or less), will take this course as the starting point. The course is designed to provide students with a mathematical foundation and critical thinking skills for entry into the majority of the trades and/or directly into the workforce. Students will acquire many practical mathematical life skills.

Math 10-1 / 20-1 / 30-1 Course Sequence

This course sequence is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical thinking skills identified for entry into post secondary programs that require the study of calculus. Topics include algebra and number; measurement; relations and functions; trigonometry; and permutations, combinations and binomial theorem.

Math 10-2 / 20-2 / 30-2 Course Sequence

This course sequence is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical thinking skills identified for post-secondary studies in programs that do not require the study of calculus. Topics include geometry, measurement, number and logic, logical reasoning, relations and functions,statistics, and probability.

Math 10-3 / 20-3 / 30-3 Course Sequence

This course sequence is designed to provide students with the mathematical understandings and critical thinking skills identified for entry into the majority of trades and for direct entry into the work force. Topics include algebra, geometry, measurement, number, statistics and probability.