Our Patron Saint

St. Timothy was born at Lystra, Lycaenia and lived in the days of the early Church when the apostles had nearly all died and the Gentile Christians were beginning to take roles of leadership.

He joined St. Paul when Paul preached at Lystra and became St. Paul’s close friend and confidant. He accompanied St. Paul on his second missionary journey. Timothy was later sent to the Thessalonians, the Corinthians and the Ephesians on behalf of St. Paul and reported on the condition of Christians.

Despite being imprisoned in Rome St. Paul continued to write Timothy letters. St. Paul made Timothy the Bishop of Ephesus. Later, Timothy suffered martyrdom himself as he opposed pagan festivals and was killed by pagans’ stones and clubs. His feast day is January 26.

Background Information:

Timothy was the son of a Greek father who was a Gentile and his mother Eunice a converted Jewess. Timothy was converted by St. Paul and later replaced Barnabas by being ordained into St. Paul’s ministry.

As a travel companion of St. Paul, Timothy was made the Bishop of the newly formed community of Ephesus. There he not only cared for that one community but moved around in a large area to care for other newly created communities.

Timothy was probably with St. Paul when he was imprisoned at Caesarea and then in Rome, but was then freed. St. Paul continued to write Timothy from prison, which included letters on describing the role of Bishop. St. Paul also wrote Timothy and begged for comfort during his imprisonment.

As the Bishop of Ephesus, Timothy’s dedication to St. Paul’s Christian ministry led to him opposing pagan celebrations and ultimately to his death. Timothy was stoned to death when he opposed the festival of Katagogian, in honor of Diana.

Patronage: against intestinal and stomach diseases

More information on our Patron Saint.



School History


Our Patron Saint

St. Timothy was born at Lystra, Lycaenia and lived in the days of the early Church when the apostles had nearly all died and the Gentile Christians were beginning to take roles of leadership.

He joined St. Paul when Paul preached at Lystra and became St. Paul’s close friend and confidant. He accompanied St. Paul on his second missionary journey. Timothy was later sent to the Thessalonians, the Corinthians and the Ephesians on behalf of St. Paul and reported on the condition of Christians.

Despite being imprisoned in Rome St. Paul continued to write Timothy letters. St. Paul made Timothy the Bishop of Ephesus. Later, Timothy suffered martyrdom himself as he opposed pagan festivals and was killed by pagans’ stones and clubs. His feast day is January 26.

Background Information:

Timothy was the son of a Greek father who was a Gentile and his mother Eunice a converted Jewess. Timothy was converted by St. Paul and later replaced Barnabas by being ordained into St. Paul’s ministry.

As a travel companion of St. Paul, Timothy was made the Bishop of the newly formed community of Ephesus. There he not only cared for that one community but moved around in a large area to care for other newly created communities.

Timothy was probably with St. Paul when he was imprisoned at Caesarea and then in Rome, but was then freed. St. Paul continued to write Timothy from prison, which included letters on describing the role of Bishop. St. Paul also wrote Timothy and begged for comfort during his imprisonment.

As the Bishop of Ephesus, Timothy’s dedication to St. Paul’s Christian ministry led to him opposing pagan celebrations and ultimately to his death. Timothy was stoned to death when he opposed the festival of Katagogian, in honor of Diana.

Patronage: against intestinal and stomach diseases

More information on our Patron Saint.